As part of the WWI Centennial Commemoration, we are proud to bring you the first of seven informative episodes about WWI.
As part of the WWI Centennial Commemoration, we are proud to bring you the second of seven informative episodes about WWI.
As part of the WWI Centennial Commemoration, we are proud to bring you the second of seven informative episodes about WWI.
World War I had a huge impact on the culture and technology of war, initiating social changes, reshaping national boundaries across the globe, and setting the United States on the path to becoming a world superpower. It was also the beginning of the Army’s reliance on a large federal Reserve force that would eventually form the U.S. Army Reserve of today – capable, combat-ready, lethal units, trained and equipped to meet the operational needs of the Army and the Joint war-fighting environment to win the Nation’s wars. Four million American men and women served in uniform during World War I, and more were killed during America’s short 18-month involvement in World War I, than during the entire Vietnam War and Korean Conflict combined.
World War I News
A legacy to emulate
Photo of Cpl. William Roper, grandfather of Maj. Gen. A.C. Roper, Deputy Commander of the U.S. Army Reserve. Cpl. Roper fought in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive of 1918 while assigned to Company F, 366th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division. His service and sacrifice has guided his grandson since youth and continues to inspire him today.
Oct. 18, 2018 - The legacy of those who served in the “war to end all wars” still resonates today for Maj. Gen. A.C. Roper, deputy commander of the U.S. Army Reserve. Their service and sacrifice has guided him since his youth and continues to inspire him today.

WWI Centennial: Honoring a Legacy of Bravery and Sacrifice
Service members and civilians of the U.S. and France pay tribute to WWI era U.S. service members during the WWI Centennial Commemoration at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery located in Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, France, Sep. 23.  

The ceremony was held to remember and honor the 14,246 service members buried here who gave their lives during the Muese-Argonne Offensive 100 years ago.
Oct. 10, 2018 - U.S. and French service members and civilians joined together throughout northern France in late September to honor the bravery and sacrifices of the American Expeditionary Forces who liberated the area a century ago.

French military hosts 7th MSC for WWI commemorations
Brig. Gen. Frederick R. Maiocco Jr., commander of the U.S. Army Reserve’s 7th Mission Support Command, joined his Soldiers, reenactors and dignitaries from France and the U.S. in honoring the U.S. Army’s 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division’s historical crossing of the bridge at the village of Nonsard, France, during the WWI Centennial Celebration, Sept. 22, 2018.
Oct. 9, 2018 - Army Reserve Soldiers from the 7th Mission Support Command got a taste of what a different generation of Soldiers faced 100 years ago, helping mark the centennial of the American Expeditionary Force’s campaigns in France during World War I.

World War I Centennial Commemoration: Honoring the past to embrace the future
Maj. Gen. Bruce Hackett, Commanding General of the 80th Training Command (The Army School System) and Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis
Sept. 27, 2018 - Walking through the fields and trenches where the 80th Division Soldiers trekked during World War I, Maj. Gen. Bruce Hackett, Commanding General of the 80th Training Command (The Army School System) participated in World War I centennial commemoration activities in Verdun, France, September 20-25, 2018.

America's Army Reserve - Yesterday and Today
From the Catalogue of Official A.E.F. Photographs taken by the Signal Corps:
Sept. 4, 2018 - For nearly three years, American president Woodrow Wilson tried to keep the United States out of World War I. He steadfastly refused pressure from all sides to join the European conflict, even though there were repeated instances of German aggression that singularly, and cumulatively, could have brought the Doughboys into battle far sooner than the summer of 1918.

New York City draftee Soldiers made history as the Lost Battalion in October 1918
Two Soldiers of the 77th Infantry Division. The division was made up of Soldiers drafteed from New York City and was known as the Metropolitan Division. In October 1918 540 of the division's Soldiers were cut off behind German lines and because known as the Lost Battalion. (Library of Congress)
Aug. 30, 2018 - One of World War I’s most heroic battlefield story features a bookish lawyer, a millionaire who charged up San Juan Hill with Teddy Roosevelt, a carrier pigeon that’s now in the Smithsonian, and draftee Soldiers from New York City who served in the 77th Division.

Why World War I matters
Army Sgt. 1st Class Al H. Pfieffer, a member of the 77th Divison, sends a message on a field phone under the watchfull eye of a British instructor, during training with the British Army in Picardy, France on May 15, 1918 in this still from the silent film
Aug. 15, 2018 - There are 13,484 reasons World War I matters to today’s Army Reserve Soldier. That is the number of Americans killed in action “Over There,” along with another 52,721 who were wounded in the fight. And these numbers reflect only those Soldiers serving in National Army divisions, the forerunner of today’s Army Reserve, not the regular Army or the National Guard. National Army units suffered 26 percent of all American casualties during the war.

WWI move of 77th Division of New York draftees, was not so secret in April 1918
Soldiers of the 77th Division's Company G, 2nd Battalion, 308th Infantry Regiment watch Britsh Army Sgt. Stevens show them the proper way to attack an enemy with their bayonet during training on May 8, 1918, in this still from the video
Aug. 6, 2018 - The move from Camp Upton, Long Island, to France was supposed to be secret, but when the U.S. Army's 77th Division left in March and April 1918, everybody in New York City-- the hometown for most of the 23,000 men-- seemed to know about it.

Did You Know?
There are 49 U.S. Army units of the National Army that served in World War I (1917-1919) that still exist today as Legacy Units. Of those Legacy Units, 21 units are now in the U.S. Army Reserve. (SOURCE:  U.S. Army Center for Military History - click the link to see the entire list)

Legacy Unit Structure of today's Army:
Active Duty - 14
National Guard - 14
Army Reserve - 21

World War I Graphics

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World War I patch chart

World War I patch chart (Click Image)
Engineer Reproduction Plant, U.S. Army,
Washington Barracks, D.C.

Call to Duty - Join the US Army WWI poster

Army Recruiting poster -  (Click Image)
Courtesy of the Library of Congress,
LC-DIG-ds-07444

Columbia Calls - Enlist Now for US Army WWI poster

Army Recruiting poster -  (Click Image)
Courtesy of the Library of Congress,
LC-DIG-ppmsca-50012