Army Combat Fitness Test

Evolution and adaptability are the cornerstones of our force. The Army Physical Fitness test served us for 40 years, and through our improved understanding of exercise science and physical training, we transition to the Army Combat Fitness Test

ACFT 2.0 became the force’s test of record Oct. 1, 2020, but troops have more time to train for and pass the test without fear of it negatively impacting their careers during this time. The event has evolved to include the option to substitute a two-minute plank, once a Soldier has attempted the leg tuck.

The other six events are still locked in; the 3 repetition maximum dead-lift, standing power throw, hand release pushups, leg tuck, 2-mile run, and sprint, drag, carry. The plank is just an interim assessment.

 

»»» ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST EVENTS

3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)

» Deadlift the maximum weight possible three times

3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)


STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)

» Throw a 10-pound medicine ball backward and overhead for distance.

STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)


HAND RELEASE PUSH-UP - ARM EXTENSION (HRP)

» Complete as many Hand-Release Push-ups as possible in two minutes.

HAND RELEASE PUSH-UP - ARM EXTENSION (HRP)


SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)

» Conduct 5 x 50 meter shuttles for time - sprint, drag, lateral, carry and sprint.

SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)


LEG TUCK (LTK)

» Complete as many leg tucks as possible; maintain a relative vertical posture while moving the hips and knees up and down without excessive swinging.

LEG TUCK (LTK)


TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)

» Run two miles for time on a measured, generally flat outdoor course.

TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)

Maj. Gen. Deborah Kotulich, U.S. Transportation Command chief of staff, talks about the new ACFT 2.0 and how women can prepare for this test.
Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Lombardo, U.S. Army Reserve Command, speaks about the changes and implementation of the new ACFT 2.0. The U.S. Army challenges all Soldiers to pass the ACFT at the gold standard. The ACFT will strengthen our fitness culture, reduce injuries, and increase Army readiness. COVID19 has had an enormous impact on our nation and on our Soldiers.
General officers and senior leaders from across the U.S. Army Reserve participated in a round robin of physical fitness events from the Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) during a "GO Forum" hosted at Fort Bragg by the U.S. Army Reserve Headquarters, March 1, 2019. By October 2020, all Army Soldiers in active Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard will be required to take the ACFT, the new gender-neutral and age-neutral readiness assessment. The ACFT will replace the current Army Physical Fitness test (APFT) that has bee in use since 1980. (U.S. Army Reserve video by Master Sgt. Michel Sauret)
Army senior leaders have approved a modification of the ACFT that included three aerobic test events for selected Soldiers with permanent profiles that prevent full participation in the 6-event test. #ACFT #ArmyFit For more information, visit https://www.army.mil/acft/. About U.S. Army: The Army Mission – our purpose – remains constant: To deploy, fight and win our nation’s wars by providing ready, prompt and sustained land dominance by Army forces across the full spectrum of conflict as part of the joint force. Connect with U.S. Army online: Web: https://www.army.mil Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/USarmy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/USArmy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/usarmy/ Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/soldiersmediacenter
This exercise reinforces correct jumping and landing skills. Requires good balance and coordination and develops explosive strength to move off the ground. Here is the breakdown of the movement, which is conducted at a moderate cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise requires advanced levels of movements skill and aerobic endurance. Here is break down of this exercise as it would be conducted in a formation at sloow cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise strengthens the trunk and hip muscle coordination while promoting control of trunk rotation. It is an advanced body weight exercise that prepares for more vigorous training, testing and combat tasks. Here is the breakdown of the movement, which is conducted at a moderate cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise improves balance, coordination and strength of core muscles in the posterior chain. Here is a breakdown of the movement, which is performed for a count 60 seconds. #ACFT #ArmyFit
The Shuttle Sprint is the third exercise in Military Movement Drill 1. This exercise prepares the Soldier for more vigorous anaerobic endurance, leg speed and agility activities. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier. #ArmyFit
The Incline Bench is a free-weight exercise performed throughout a Soldier’s career to improve upper body muscular strength and endurance. This lift requires trunk and shoulder stability and strength. It can be used to improve training and testing performance that supports a wide range of combat and occupational physical tasks. There are a wide range of modifications in position and equipment for the Incline Bench. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier using three types of free weights – straight bar or barbell, kettle bells and dumbbells. #ArmyFit
The sumo dead lift is a free weight exercise performed throughout the Soldier's career to improve lower body muscular strength and endurance. It is a modification of the deadlift that further challenges a Soldier's coordination, balance and hip mobility. Here's a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier using three types of weights: straight bar, kettle bells and dumb bells. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise strengthens the Soldier's triceps and shoulder muscles endurance. This improves the Soldier's skill in moving heavier weight overhead to build muscular power and strength. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
This exercise strengthens the muscles of the upper back, the shoulder girdle and the biceps. Hevier weight also challenge the muscles in the lower back, gluteal region and hamstrings. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
This exercise strengthens the chest, shoulder and triceps' muscles. It develops the Soldier's ability to push during more vigorous combatives, testing and combat tasks. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
The Straight Leg Dead Lift is a free-weight exercise performed throughout a Soldier’s career to improve lower body muscular strength and endurance. It is a modification of the deadlift that further challenges the muscles in the lower back, hips and legs. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier using a straight bar and dumbbells. #ArmyFit
This exercise develops total body strength, endurance and mobility. Releasing the hands from the ground in addition to moving the arms to the "T" position emphasizes full push and reach motions. Here is the breakdown of the movement as it would be conducted in a formation at a moderate cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise develops explosive strength in the legs. Here is the breakdown of the exercise conducted at formation at a slow cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
The bent-leg raise is the first exercise for "Four for the CORE." This exercise improves awareness for spinal control while moving the legs. The hand position under the back and not the pelvis places heavy emphasis on the strength of the core muscles of the abdomen, not the hip flexor muscles. Here's the breakdown of the movements performed for a count of 60 seconds. #ACFT #ArmyFit The core of the body consists of the abdomen, the pelvis and lower or lumbar spine. The muscles that originate in the core provides stability and motion for the limbs and trunk. Regular performance of "Four for the Core" provides a foundation of good stability for all physical readiness exercises. Returning to the position of attention between exercises provides a moment to reset posture and check the improvements these exercises provide from moving to and from the ground.
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ACFT events graphic

311th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) conducts ACFT training
Soldiers from the 311th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) were given Army Combat Fitness Test training in order to be ready for the forthcoming fitness test standards set forth by the United States Army, in the 311th ESC drill hall July 7. First Lt. Armany Hidalgo, 311th ESC finance officer, volunteered to attend the training in order to get a better understanding of the ACFT and to practice the different events. Hidalgo demonstrates the “Pull, Drag, Carry” event, pulling a 90 pound weight.
Aug. 5, 2020 - Soldiers from the 311th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) were given Army Combat Fitness Test training in order to be ready for the forthcoming fitness test standards set forth by the United States Army, in the 311th ESC drill hall July 7.

No gym needed to improve fitness
U.S. Army Reserve Master Sgt. Susan Benavidez, an operations non-commissioned officer with the 211th Regional Support Group and Hood Mobilization Brigade, shows off her social distancing shirt during a workout session on March 25, 2020 at Fort Hood stadium. Soldiers with the Hood Mob Brigade practiced social distancing during their fitness sessions. 



U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jasmine Edden
June 26, 2020 - Maintaining physical fitness is an individual requirement for every service member. Training the body to be prepared for the rigors of combat takes dedication, motivation, and a fitness training plan that pushes your body to be tougher, faster and develop greater endurance. Traditionally, having access to gyms and company organized physical training helped Soldiers meet these goals by providing weights, cardio equipment, and workout programs.

FAQs: COVID-19 impact to the U.S. Army Reserve
May 19, 2020 - These questions have been submitted by Soldiers to various U.S. Army Reserve social media websites. Here, Soldiers may find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions.

Army Reserve Support Command Soldiers prepping for Army Combat Fitness Test
Maj. Kyle Krebs, a G3 Operations briefing officer, sends a medicine ball flying during the standing power throw, one of six events on the Army Combat Fitness Test. The First Army United States Army Reserve Support Command is holding a diagnostic ACFT during its quarterly battle assemblies on Rock Island Arsenal, Ill., to prepare its Soldiers for when the ACFT becomes the Army's test of record in October. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army)
Feb. 13, 2020 - Medicine balls thud to the concrete floor while grunts of determination reverberate from the walls. Soldiers gathered in this unheated gym on a winter morning have no trouble keeping warm, owing to their incessant activity. An Army Combat Fitness Test is underway in "The Trench," First Army's unofficial gym adjacent to its headquarters building.

Fit to fight: 81st Readiness Division first to receive ACFT fielding in Army Reserve
Army Combat Fitness Test equipment fielding arrives to the New Equipment Fielding Facility on Fort Jackson, S.C., allowing Army Reserve units within the 81st Readiness Division's footprint to start the training process to be ready for the new physical fitness test Feb. 4. Army Reserve units throughout the southeast region started accepting ACFT fielding equipment beginning Jan. 15.
Feb. 7, 2020 - Multiple locations across the 81st Readiness Division’s footprint received the initial fielding of the new Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) equipment beginning Jan. 15 and continuing throughout February.