Army senior leaders have approved a new strenuous fitness test designed to better prepare Soldiers for combat tasks, reduce injuries and lead to ample cost savings across the service.

The six-event readiness assessment, called the Army Combat Fitness Test, is intended to replace the current three-event Army Physical Fitness Test, which has been around since 1980.

Beginning October 2020, all Soldiers will be required to take the new gender- and age-neutral test. Before that, field testing set to begin this October will allow the Army to refine the test, with initial plans for up to 40,000 Soldiers from all three components to see it.

“Focus on your personal physical fitness today. Be able to pass the current Army PT test now. We'll work our way through the ACFT as we go. We'll get better and we'll get stronger and at the end of the day, we'll be able to execute the test to standard, just the way we do the current PT test."

LTG Charles D. Luckey
Chief of Army Reserve
and Commanding General,
U.S. Army Reserve Command

Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, chief of Army Reserve and commanding general, U.S. Army Reserve Command, sends his message to the field about the Army Combat Fitness Test, the newest way the Army will evaluate the physical fitness and endurance of its Soldiers.
CSM Ted Copeland, Command Sergeant Major of the Army Reserve, and his Senior Enlisted Council take the new Army Combat Fitness Test. The ACFT is slated to become the Physical Fitness test of record for the entire U.S Army by late 2020.
This exercise strengthens the trunk and hip muscle coordination while promoting control of trunk rotation. It is an advanced body weight exercise that prepares for more vigorous training, testing and combat tasks. Here is the breakdown of the movement, which is conducted at a moderate cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise reinforces correct jumping and landing skills. Requires good balance and coordination and develops explosive strength to move off the ground. Here is the breakdown of the movement, which is conducted at a moderate cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise requires advanced levels of movements skill and aerobic endurance. Here is break down of this exercise as it would be conducted in a formation at sloow cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise improves balance, coordination and strength of core muscles in the posterior chain. Here is a breakdown of the movement, which is performed for a count 60 seconds. #ACFT #ArmyFit
The Shuttle Sprint is the third exercise in Military Movement Drill 1. This exercise prepares the Soldier for more vigorous anaerobic endurance, leg speed and agility activities. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier. #ArmyFit
The Incline Bench is a free-weight exercise performed throughout a Soldier’s career to improve upper body muscular strength and endurance. This lift requires trunk and shoulder stability and strength. It can be used to improve training and testing performance that supports a wide range of combat and occupational physical tasks. There are a wide range of modifications in position and equipment for the Incline Bench. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier using three types of free weights – straight bar or barbell, kettle bells and dumbbells. #ArmyFit
The sumo dead lift is a free weight exercise performed throughout the Soldier's career to improve lower body muscular strength and endurance. It is a modification of the deadlift that further challenges a Soldier's coordination, balance and hip mobility. Here's a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier using three types of weights: straight bar, kettle bells and dumb bells. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise strengthens the Soldier's triceps and shoulder muscles endurance. This improves the Soldier's skill in moving heavier weight overhead to build muscular power and strength. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
This exercise strengthens the muscles of the upper back, the shoulder girdle and the biceps. Hevier weight also challenge the muscles in the lower back, gluteal region and hamstrings. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
This exercise strengthens the chest, shoulder and triceps' muscles. It develops the Soldier's ability to push during more vigorous combatives, testing and combat tasks. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted for one minute. #ArmyFit #ACFT
The Straight Leg Dead Lift is a free-weight exercise performed throughout a Soldier’s career to improve lower body muscular strength and endurance. It is a modification of the deadlift that further challenges the muscles in the lower back, hips and legs. Here is a breakdown of the exercise as it would be conducted by an individual Soldier using a straight bar and dumbbells. #ArmyFit
This exercise develops total body strength, endurance and mobility. Releasing the hands from the ground in addition to moving the arms to the "T" position emphasizes full push and reach motions. Here is the breakdown of the movement as it would be conducted in a formation at a moderate cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
This exercise develops explosive strength in the legs. Here is the breakdown of the exercise conducted at formation at a slow cadence. #ACFT #ArmyFit
The bent-leg raise is the first exercise for "Four for the CORE." This exercise improves awareness for spinal control while moving the legs. The hand position under the back and not the pelvis places heavy emphasis on the strength of the core muscles of the abdomen, not the hip flexor muscles. Here's the breakdown of the movements performed for a count of 60 seconds. #ACFT #ArmyFit The core of the body consists of the abdomen, the pelvis and lower or lumbar spine. The muscles that originate in the core provides stability and motion for the limbs and trunk. Regular performance of "Four for the Core" provides a foundation of good stability for all physical readiness exercises. Returning to the position of attention between exercises provides a moment to reset posture and check the improvements these exercises provide from moving to and from the ground.
Army Reserve commanding general and Soldiers participate in ACFT pilot program
Lt. Gen. Charles Luckey, chief of the Army Reserve, and commanding general, U.S. Army Reserve Command addresses a group of Soldiers preparing to participate in the Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) pilot program. The ACFT will replace the current fitness test of record by October 2020. (U.S. Army Reserve photo by Sgt. 1st Class Javier Orona/Released)
Jan. 15, 2019 - Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, chief of Army Reserve and commanding general, U.S. Army Reserve Command, and United States Army Reserve Soldiers from multiple units participated in the Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) Pilot Program, Jan. 10, 2019, at the Austin Armed Forces Reserve Center in Austin, Texas.
Click graphic below to enlarge

ACFT events graphic