African-American Heritage

African-Americans in World War IITHROUGHOUT AMERICA'S HISTORY, from the Battle of Lexington to the Battle for Fallujah, Black Soldiers have honorably answered the call to duty, serving with great valor and distinction in America’s armed forces. Since the birth of our nation, African-American Soldiers have demonstrated the Army's core values. For generations, these proud heroes have played an integral role in protecting and shaping this nation.

During February, the Army celebrates and pays tribute to Black Soldiers and recognizes the important contributions they have made in past wars and are continuing to make today in overseas operations.

 
Pictured right: "Cpl. Carlton Chapman...is a machine-gunner in an M-4 tank, attached to a Motor Transport unit near Nancy, France." (Photo Courtesy of the National Archives, 761st Mt. Bn. November 5, 1944.)
FEATURED VIDEOS
U.S. Army Reserve Chief Warrant Officer 5 Phillip Brashear is a helicopter pilot with combat experience and the son of Carl Brashear, the first African-American master diver in U.S. Navy’s history who lost his leg during a tragic accident on a diver mission off the coast of Spain in 1966. Carl Brashear’s life story was featured in the Hollywood film “Men of Honor” starring Cuba Gooding Jr. and Robert De Niro.
Lt. Col. Frederick Moss runs multiple military races each year — including the Army Ten Miler in Washington, D.C. — while carrying a binder holding the names of the fallen Vietnam War service members. Moss decided to print the binder and run with it in honor of his father, Terry Leon Williams, who is a Vietnam veteran who survived the war, but who lost comrades in combat.
Part 4 of 4 on our series featuring Miss USA 2016, Capt. Deshauna Barber, Commander 988th Quartermaster Detachment. In this episode, CPT Barber talks about serving in the Army Reserve, competing in pageants, and breaking stereotypes.
U.S. Army Reserve Maj. Gen. A.C. Roper currently serves as deputy commanding general of U.S. Army Reserve Command. In this 2016 video, the then-commanding general for the 80th Training Command (TASS) and chief of police for the Birmingham Police Department (AL) Major Crimes, discusses the importance of goals and how the Army Reserve has taught him leadership skills to be successful in both his military and civilian career.
Staff Sgt. Zedrik Pitts from the 663rd Eng. Co. transferred to the Warrior Transition Battalion after discovering he had a debilitating disease. It was there that he took up cycling as a way to cope with his illness. The support of the WTB and his unit, and his resilience and persistance, have enabled Staff Sgt. Pitts to become a champion-level competitor and an Olympic hopeful.
“All rise,” is a sound that is all too familiar to everyone, whether by television or actually being in a courtroom for any number of reasons. It’s a sound that has become almost second nature for many courtroom officials and for Brig. Gen. Ural Glanville, Chief Judge of United States Army Court of Criminal Appeals, one that sounds like much responsibility that he gladly accepts.
IN THE NEWS
FAQs: COVID- 19 Vaccine
Jan. 12, 2021 - Here, Soldiers may find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about the vaccine.

In pursuit of excellence: Army Reserve lawyer first Black dean of country’s oldest law school
Benjamin Spencer, dean of the William & Mary Law School, poses for a portrait in one of the school’s courtrooms building in Williamsburg, Virginia, Dec. 1, 2020. Spencer is the first African-American dean hired by the oldest law school in the country and a U.S. Army Reserve captain and lawyer who works for the Government Appellate Division. Spencer graduated from Harvard Law School and joined the Army when he was almost 41 because he felt a calling to serve people and serve his nation. (U.S. Army Reserve photo by Master Sgt. Michel Sauret)
July 31, 2020 - Capt. Benjamin Spencer is a U.S. Army Reserve lawyer who works for the Government Appellate Division. He is the first African American Dean hired at William & Mary, working for the oldest law school in the country.

A time of honor: Legacy begun by U.S. Navy legend continues with Army Reserve pilot and beyond
Chief Warrant Officer 4 Phillip Brashear (right), a U.S. Army Reserve command chief warrant officer for the 80th Training Command, poses for a portrait with his son Tyler Brashear, an ROTC cadet at North Carolina A&T State University, while holding a photo of his father in Greensboro, North Carolina, Jan. 16, 2020. Phillip Brashear is a helicopter pilot with combat experience and the son of Carl Brashear, the first African-American master diver in U.S. Navy’s history who lost his leg during a tragic accident on a diver mission off the coast of Spain in 1966. Carl Brashear’s life story about overcoming physical and racial adversity was featured in the Hollywood film “Men of Honor” starring Cuba Gooding Jr. and Robert De Niro. Phillip Brashear has more than 38 years of military service between the U.S. Navy Reserve, the U.S. Army National Guard and the U.S. Army Reserve. He spent the majority of his Army career as a helicopter pilot with deployments to Bosnia and Iraq. (U.S. Army Reserve photo by Master Sgt. Michel Sauret)
Jan. 29, 2020 - Phillip Brashear is the command chief warrant officer for the 80th Training Command, and the son of Carl Brashear, the first African-American master diver in U.S. Navy’s history who lost his leg during a tragic accident on a mission off the coast of Spain in 1966.

Carrying the names: Army Reserve officer runs to honor father’s Vietnam generation
Lt. Col. Frederick Moss, a senior staff officer for the U.S. Army Reserve Headquarters at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, stares into the camera for a portrait at the North Carolina Veterans Park in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Sept. 27, 2019. Moss runs multiple military races each year — including the Army Ten Miler in Washington, D.C. — while carrying a binder holding the names of the fallen Vietnam War service members. Moss decided to print the binder and run with it in honor of his father, Terry Leon Williams, who is a Vietnam veteran who survived the war, but who lost comrades in combat. Moss recognized that his father’s generation of veterans were rarely welcomed with open arms after they returned from war. His desire to run with the binder is an effort to bring remembrance to their legacy. (U.S. Army Reserve photo by Master Sgt. Michel Sauret)
Oct. 18, 2019 - Lt. Col. Frederick Moss carries a binder with the names of the Vietnam Memorial Wall in his hands each year during the Army Ten Miler. Moss decided to print the binder and run with it in honor of his father, Terry Leon Williams, who is a Vietnam veteran who survived the war, but who lost comrades in combat.

A legacy to emulate
Photo of Cpl. William Roper, grandfather of Maj. Gen. A.C. Roper, Deputy Commander of the U.S. Army Reserve. Cpl. Roper fought in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive of 1918 while assigned to Company F, 366th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division. His service and sacrifice has guided his grandson since youth and continues to inspire him today.
Oct. 18, 2018 - The legacy of those who served in the “war to end all wars” still resonates today for Maj. Gen. A.C. Roper, deputy commander of the U.S. Army Reserve. Their service and sacrifice has guided him since his youth and continues to inspire him today.