Lt. Col. Julie Fung-Hayes, an emergency physician and flight surgeon, shares why she loves serving in the U.S. Army Reserve. Learn more here: https://bit.ly/2FlT26s
COL Jay Johannigman, Army Reserve Physician, Cincinnati, OH, tells us why he loves the Army Reserve.
Today's Army Reserve covers more than 20 time zones across five continents. We are a battle-tested force facing a future with sophisticated adversaries. We must shift our focus and continue to adapt. We must be physically fit, mentally tough, and determined to defeat the enemy and dominate our foes. America's Army Reserve: the most capable, combat-ready, lethal federal reserve force in the history of the nation. (U.S. Army Reserve video by Calvin Reimold, Spc. Maria Casneiro and Sgt. 1st Class Jerimiah Richardson)
Deployment Graduation and Looking Forward
As online learning took hold across most colleges and universities earlier this year, Spc. Jose Flores-Colon may have appeared like just another online student. But, unlike more traditional students, Flores-Colon, completed his Bachelors in Health Science, at Purdue University, while deployed to Camp Buehring, Kuwait, as a member of the 411th Hospital Center.
Aug. 18, 2020 - As online learning took hold across most colleges and universities earlier this year, Spc. Jose Flores-Colon may have appeared like just another online student. But, unlike more traditional students, Flores-Colon, completed his Bachelors in Health Science, at Purdue University, while deployed to Camp Buehring, Kuwait, as a member of the 411th Hospital Center. Although online learning may be new for many students, the military has supported online and distance learning opportunities for deployed Soldiers for years. Flores-Colon balanced his time as a Pharmacy Specialist, providing outpatient pharmacy services for military members and working with night shift medics to provide support during the COVID-19 pandemic along with finishing his last terms of school online.

411th Hospital Center Conducts Deployed Emergency Training
Working a live code is highly stressful and having a team that knows their roles can make the difference between life and death. Soldiers with the 411th Hospital Center, Code Blue Team, at US Military Hospital-Kuwait, makes sure that readiness is maintained in each section of the hospital including nonmedical shops.
Aug. 10, 2020 - Working a live code is highly stressful and having a team that knows their roles can make the difference between life and death, said several members of the Code Blue Committee, from the 411th Hospital Center, at the US Military Hospital-Kuwait. Soldiers at the USMK-K employ a Code Blue Committee that conducts weekly, mock medical code training events within the hospital, to maintaining the highest possible standards when working an emergency. The team works together, utilizing their specialties, as realistically as possible and train with at least one section weekly. “Each member of the Code Blue team is selected to ensure the most effective and efficient response to a cardiac or respiratory arrest situation. The team consists of providers, nurses, medics, anesthesiologists, respiratory therapists, pharmacy members, laboratory members, and radiology members,” said, Staff Sgt. Daniell Ledezma, EMT NCOIC, with the 411th Hospital Center. Pharmacy delivers all ACLS medications required for treatment. Respiratory therapists and anesthesiologists bring an intubation kit with supplemental oxygen. The EMT team brings a stretcher, cardiac monitor/defibrillator and equipment to gain IV access to administer medications. “In addition to hands on training, the committee ensures hospital staff follow current hospital and ACLS protocols. This process guarantees that the sections and Code Blue team have adequate experience and training to manage a lifesaving event,” said, Ledezma. This training is one of many way Soldiers from the 411th Hospital Center maintain readiness in each section of the hospital, including nonmedical shops.

UAMTFs Support Change and Improved Patient Health
Embedding a Quality Improvement Officer within the Task Force’s Command and Clinical Operations structure helped strengthen the integration of the UAMTF 804-1 soldiers into Queens Hospital Center (QHC) and its staff. This model facilitated close collaboration with the QHC leadership and proved indispensable to formulate, obtain buy-in, coordinate and enact quality of care measures to the benefit of the hospital’s patients and Force Health Protection. Prone positioning was just one of several quality improvement projects that the Task Force promoted and helped put into action.
Aug. 10, 2020 - “I was honored to be a member of Urban Augmentation Medical Task Force 804-1. We provided a vital service to the people of Queens in general, and more specifically to the patients and staff of Queens Hospital Center. To have been a part of this mission to combat the novel coronavirus pandemic is something I will never forget. Our sense of accomplishment at Queens Hospital Center was bolstered by the quality improvements we helped bring about that will hopefully endure long after we’ve gone home,” said Lt. Col. Robert Steckler, a 60K, Urologist with UAMTF 804-1. One of the quality improvements implemented by UAMTF 804-1 was the medical procedure known as prone positioning. Proning is a critical treatment option for COVID-19 patients who have insufficient oxygen within their blood and require mechanical ventilation.

Modernizing mitigation of COVID-19
U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. Christopher Garrett, a lab technician with the 18th Field Hospital, Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Virginia, demonstrates the steps of a COVID-19 test on a GeneXpert system on Camp Buehring, Kuwait, July 30, 2020. Camp Buehring recently acquired the hi-tech system allowing turn arounds for COVID-19 tests to be less than an hour. (Photo by U.S. Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Christopher Osburn)
Aug. 7, 2020 - On the battlefield, a few seconds can be the difference between someone living or someone dying. In the war on COVID-19, time can be an enemy or a friend, as well. The time spent waiting on results is time the virus can quickly spread to other individuals. Military personnel at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, recently acquired a new weapon in their arsenal.

327th Medical Detachment teaches Soldiers the BASICS of mental health
U.S. Army Spc. Sean Ford, a behavioral health tech with the 327th Combat Operation Stress Control, leads a class on mental health in the CENTCOM area of responsibility, Aug. 1, 2020. The behavioral aspects of health in a command structure class teaches Soldiers resiliency, stress management, effective communication, team building. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Andrew Valenza)
Aug. 7, 2020 - If you or your Soldiers are struggling with mental health issues while deployed odds are there are people right around the corner ready to help.
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