USACAPOC(A) units can start inputting orders for Soldiers now

By By Lt. Col. Jefferson Wolfe, USACAPOC(A) Public Affairs Officer | USACAPOC | Oct. 11, 2018

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — FORT BRAGG, N.C. — For first time in more than a decade, the Defense Department entered the fiscal year with a budget, and United States Army Civil Affairs & Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) budget analysts are asking units to input orders for Soldiers as soon as possible.

The Department of Defense commends the signing of House Resolution 6157, the fiscal year 2019 DOD and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Act and Continuing Appropriations Act, according to a press release from DOD. This act will fund the DOD for FY 2019.

This is the first time in more than a decade that the DOD is able to begin a fiscal year with an enacted appropriation instead of operating under a continuing resolution, the release stated.

“Units are now able to start executing their missions immediately,” said Maj. James B. Lyle, the Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve funding chief for USACAPOC (A). “They can put Soldiers on orders, purchase supplies and conduct training events.”

The funding level is consistent with the $716 billion 2018 Bipartisan Budget Act national defense spending cap for FY 2019 and the recently enacted FY 2019 National Defense Authorization Act.

USACAPOC (A) training noncommissioned officers and unit administrators should input Request for Orders into Regional Level Application Software as soon as possible, Lyle said.

The down trace units have received funding to start publishing orders, he added. USACAPOC(A) and all USARC units receive funds on a quarterly basis.

The down trace units have received funding and can use this initial funding to start publishing orders, Lyle said. However, RFOs must be aligned with the command’s vision, Lines of Effort, strategy and commanding general’s guidance.

Putting in RFOs now shows USARC that USACAPOC (A) units are already using their funds, he said. Once established, units can receive more money for additional requests that have not received funding.

Of the $716 billion defense funding, which includes DOD and other non-DOD defense entities, such as the Department of Energy, $686 billion is allocated for DOD.

This appropriation directly supports the three main lines of effort in the 2018 National Defense Strategy: Restoring readiness and building a more lethal force; strengthening existing alliances while building new partnerships abroad; and reforming and modernizing our department for greater affordability, accountability and performance.

The funding level is consistent with the $716 billion 2018 Bipartisan Budget Act national defense spending cap for FY 2019 and the recently enacted FY 2019 National Defense Authorization Act.

“What the troops have seen is a commitment from the executive and legislative branches of government to give them the wherewithal to do their jobs,” said Marine Corps Gen. Joe Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, during an interview with reporters traveling with him.