Combat Lifesaver Training

June 03, 2012

Story and photos courtesy Lt. Col. Brenda L. Ver Voort, Battalion Commander​, 3-334th Regiment

 

Drill sergeants with the 3-334th Regiment, 4th Brigade, 95th Training Division (IET) conducted combat lifesaver training April 12-15, 2012, at the Medical Simulation Training Center, Fort McCoy, Wis. 

This 40-hour course is designed for non-medical personnel to gain basic medical knowledge to save wounded Soldiers on the battlefield, an annual training requirement for drill sergeants.

During the course the drill sergeants were trained to provide immediate care on how to stop severe bleeding, recognize and treat for shock, manage the airway, and perform needle chest decompression for a casualty with tension pneumothorax (the presence of air or gas in the pleural cavity). 

The training involved three scenarios of hands-on training and skill testing with life-like mannequins programmed to simulate breathing and bleeding. The training allowed the Soldiers to take and record vital signs such as pulse, respiration and blood pressure.    

 

​Drill sergeants experience realism during their annual combat lifesaver training. Sgt. First Class William Ingalls applies a tourniquet to the left leg of a life-like mannequin while Sgt. Todd Stremmel checks the airway and monitors responsiveness. Courtesy photo.

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