Nutrition & Weight Management

A Soldier's level of health and well-being has a direct impact
on his or her combat readiness. Not only are physically fit and healthy
Soldiers essential to the Army, they are also more likely
to have enjoyable, productive lives.


Total Force Fitness U.S. Army H2F Holistic Health and Fitness

Nutritional Fitness/Readiness is an essential element of both
the Department of Defense Total Force Fitness model
and the U.S. Army Holistic Health and Fitness System.

Nutrition Resources

Focus on an overall healthy eating pattern for good health. Eat more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds, and lean protein.

Performance Triad (P3)
https://p3.amedd.army.mil/

Human Performance Resources
https://www.hprc-online.org/

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS)
https://www.opss.org/

Operation Live Well
https://www.health.mil/Military-Health-Topics/Operation-Live-Well

USDA Nutrition
https://www.nutrition.gov/

Choose My Plate
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/

USDA Food and Nutrition
https://www.usda.gov/topics/food-and-nutrition

Weight Management Resources

Maintaining a healthy weight can help you feel better and have more energy. Eating high-quality food is important for preventing weight gain and promoting weight loss.

Performance Triad (P3) - Weight Control
https://p3.amedd.army.mil/performance-learning-center/nutrition/weight-control

Human Performance Resources – Get Into Fighting Weight: A Total Force Fitness Guide
https://www.hprc-online.org/total-force-fitness/fighting-weight

Military OneSource Health & Wellness Coach
https://www.militaryonesource.mil/confidential-help/specialty-consultations/health-wellness-coaching/take-command-of-your-well-being-with-a-health-and-wellness-coach

Body Composition & Health Risk

The amount and location of body fat is important to overall health.

Are you at a healthy weight?
Being at an unhealthy weight increases your risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, cholesterol problems, heart disease, gallbladder disease, female health disorders, arthritis, some types of cancer, and sleep apnea.

Calculate Body Mass Index (BMI):
A BMI of 30 or above increases your disease risk.

Measure Waist Circumference:
A waist larger than 40 inches for men and 35 inches for women increases the chances of developing heart disease, cancer, or other chronic disease.

AR 600-9
https://ssilrc.army.mil/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/AR-600-9-The-Army-Body-Composition-Program-16-July-2019.pdf

NIH Assessing Your Weight and Health Risk
https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/risk.htm

CDC Healthy Weight
https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/

Resource for Army Reserve Soldiers (not on active duty) failing to meet the height/weight/body fat standard that satisfies the “Self-directed program” option per AR 600-9:

  1. Unit personnel will enroll the Soldier in the Army Body Composition Program (ABCP) per AR 600-9.
    https://ssilrc.army.mil/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/AR-600-9-The-Army-Body-Composition-Program-16-July-2019.pdf
    1. ‚ÄčA Commanders memo will be provided to the Soldier for initial notification counseling
      Commanders Memo for Initial Notification.docx
    2. The Soldier will provide acknowledgment of enrollment in the ABCP to the unit personnel
      Soldier Acknowledgment of Enrollment in Army Body Composition Program.docx
       
  2. The Soldier will review TG 358 as required within 14 days of enrollment in ABCP per AR 600-9.
    https://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/healthyliving/n/Pages/WeightManagement.aspx

  3. The Soldier will complete a Soldier Action Plan and provide to unit personnel no later than the next MUTA after the notification counseling per AR 600-9.
    Soldier Action Plan - ABCP.docx

  4. The Soldier will review Fit For Performance - Weight Loss Strategies Powered by P3 (Performance Triad) and report back to Unit Personnel.
    https://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/healthyliving/n/Pages/WeightManagement.aspx