1939-1945

1941:WWII
1945: NEW POLICY FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS
1948: IMPLEMENTATION OF DRILL PAY



1941: IMPLEMENTATION OF ARMY RESERVE IN WWII


The number of Army Reserve officers on active duty rose from less than 3,000 to more than 57,000. World War II signified the beginning of a new era in national security, and from that point on the United States became the "arsenal of democracy" and "world guardian," a new mission in which the Army Reserve would play a major role. 


1945: NEW POLICY

September: Secretary of War Robert P. Patterson appoints a board of three general officers to investigate the Army's policy with respect to African-Americans and to prepare a new policy that would provide for the efficient use of African-Americans in the Army. This board is called the Gillem Board, after its chairman, General Alvan C. Gillem, Jr.

September 12: In a letter to the National Urban League, President Truman says that the government has "an obligation to see that the civil rights of every citizen are fully and equally protected."

December 6: President Truman appoints the President's Committee on Civil Rights.



(Caption: President Truman Address to the NAACP at the Lincoln Memorial, June 29, 1947 Courtesy Photo Harry S. Truman Library and Museum).


1948: DRILL PAY

Recognizing the importance of the Organized Reserve to American success during World War II, Congress authorized retirement and drill pay for the first time.