America celebrates July 4 as Independence Day to celebrate patriotism and love for our country. It is also a reminder of how the U.S. Army Reserve is ready to meet the needs and challenges of this great nation. Happy birthday, America!
Command Sgt. Maj. Anthony Lombardo, U.S. Army Reserve Command, speaks about the changes and implementation of the new ACFT 2.0. The U.S. Army challenges all Soldiers to pass the ACFT at the gold standard. The ACFT will strengthen our fitness culture, reduce injuries, and increase Army readiness. COVID19 has had an enormous impact on our nation and on our Soldiers.
This video serves as the virtual Change of Responsibility ceremony between Previously, Lombardo served as command sergeant major of the 200th Military Police Command, Fort Meade, Md. He is a combat veteran who has served in every leadership position from team leader to division command sergeant major. During his 34 years of distinguished military service, he has served in six overseas deployments including Operation Desert Shield/Storm, Operation Joint Guard Bosnia, Operation Joint Guardian Kosovo, twice in service in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan). Lombardo is a native New Yorker and in his civilian career, he serves as a police executive holding the rank of deputy inspector with the New York City Police Department. As the 14th Command Sergeant Major of the Army Reserve, Lombardo will be the principal enlisted adviser to the Commanding General, U.S. Army Reserve Command, and other senior Army leaders on regulations, policies and quality of life issues related to nearly 200,000 Army Reserve Soldiers. He will succeed Command Sgt. Maj. Ted Copeland, who has served in the position since March 2017. Lombardo earned a Master’s of Science Degree in the Administration of Justice from the University of Louisville. He is a 2007 honor graduate of the prestigious Southern Police Institute and a 2016 graduate of the Naval Post-Graduate Institute Executive Leaders Course. Lombardo is a New York State licensed emergency medical technician and a nationally certified emergency medical technician.
In this episode, Binson attempts to find and squash the "Bug" that might get his grandma sick. Binson is an energetic and lovable character who teaches children important lessons about COVID-19 and other issues through his playful exploration. Through such play, he finds the reasons for the guidelines that Army Reserve Families should follow. These short shows are intended for children of all ages.
Take our survey to identify how you, Army Reserve Soldiers, Civilians, and Family Members, are currently receiving information from the Army Reserve. We will use this survey to pinpoint the types of information you would like to receive from the Army Reserve and to make improvements in the delivery method.
"We are a values based organization. So, when in doubt, look to our seven Army Values to be the guideposts, to be the road signs, to make sure we're on track. Racism is contrary to our Army Values. It's actually an insider threat, but it dwells within hearts, and it dwells within our ranks, and we must do everything we can to root it out and crush it."
"A lot of conversation here in America over the last week or two since George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis about what does the rule of law mean. Conversations about violence, about people who are protesting. Talks about disobedience, discord, disharmony in America. Remember a fundamental fact, fundamental truth about being American. Protest, so long as it's peaceful, not only is it lawful, it's a part of who we are."
On this episode of AR/60: 1. Virtual Battle Assemblies are now in full swing; 2. Help to train for ACFT without equipment; 3. Career Progression resources available virtually
The Seven Core Army Values are what being a U.S. Army Reserve Soldier is all about. How do you live these values on and off the field?
Want to know more about the Army Reserve? America's Army Reserve: The most capable, combat-ready, and lethal Federal Reserve force in the history of the Nation.
Suicides among our ranks affect not only families but also unit readiness and morale - directly hampering the capability, combat-readiness, and lethality of America's Army Reserve.
If you are interested in receiving an Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship and commissioning into the Army Reserve, the GRFD Scholarship Minuteman Campaign covers 4 years of full tuition and fees or $10,000 for room and board at colleges and universities served by an Army ROTC program.
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Army Reserve nurse deploys to Saipan in support of COVID-19 response
Nurses from the 1984th U.S. Army Hospital-Pacific, headquartered at Fort Shafter Flats, Honolulu, Hawaii, deployed to the Commonwealth of the Northern Marian islands to help increase medical capacity.
July 2, 2020 - Maj. James F. Schmidt, a certified nurse anesthetist, was one of six nurses assigned to the 1984th U.S. Army Hospital – Pacific, 9th Mission Support Command, that deployed to the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands to provide medical expertise in support of COVID-19 response efforts.

Double Eagle 6: Leadership through the lens of a communicator
Photo By Staff Sgt. Felix Fimbres | Lt. Gen. Charles Luckey speaks with Soldiers from the 77th Sustainment Brigade who were deployed to Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, December 18, 2019. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Felix R. Fimbres)
July 2, 2020 - Watching Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey lead is a master class in the dual nature of leadership: half commander and half service to those he leads.

Choosing something different: Delmar D. Davis III
U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Delar Davis III, an information technology specialist with the 335th Signal Command (Theater), poses for a portrait at East Point, Georgia, May 28, 2020. Soldiers from the 335th Signal Command (Theater) headquarters took part in the U.S. Army's
July 2, 2020 - In a town so small that you can’t date anyone because it’s likely they’re related, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Delmar Davis III had two options. Stay and work on his grandfather’s farm, picking soybeans and sweet potatoes in the Georgia heat or do something different. He chose something different. Davis grew up in Henderson, 40 miles south of Macon. His whole family lives there, including his mom Patricia, a department manager at Walmart. His dad, Delmar Jr., works in neighboring Fort Valley at Bluebird Corporation, building school buses.

Top Army Reserve general relinquishes command
Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, the outgoing commanding general and Chief of U.S. Army Reserve, speaks during his Relinquishment of Command Ceremony at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, Jun. 30, 2020. The ceremony marks the turning of a new page in the U.S. Army Reserve's history book. The ceremony was attended by Gen. James C. McConville, Chief of Staff of the Army; Gen. Michael X. Garrett, commanding general of the U.S. Army Forces Command; Sgt. Maj. of the Army Michael A. Grinston; Maj. Gen. A.C. Roper, deputy commanding general of the U.S. Army Reserve Command; and Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Lombardo, U.S. Army Reserve command sergeant major. (U.S. Army Reserve photo by Staff Sgt. Felix Fimbres)
July 1, 2020 - The Army Reserve's top general concluded his tour, relinquishing his responsibilities during a ceremony, officiated by Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. James C. McConville, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, June 30, 2020.

LTG Charles D. Luckey retiring after over 43 years of service
Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, Chief of Army Reserve and Commanding General, U.S. Army Reserve Command, together with Brig. Gen. Katherine White, Deputy Commander of the 46 Military Police Command, meet with Soldiers and civilians providing efforts to battle the COVID-19 virus at the TCF Center in Detroit, Michigan, April 20, 2020. U.S. Northern Command, through U.S. Army North, is providing military support to the Federal Emergency Management Agency to help communities in need. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Brian Pearson)
June 30, 2020 - Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, Chief of Army Reserve and Commanding General, United States Army Reserve Command, will retire this summer from the Army after over 43 years of service to the nation.

Devens Reserve Forces Training Area strengthens environmental stewardship through Qualified Recycling Program
June 30, 2020 - What does it take to be the most capable, combat-ready reserve force? A focus on training to win the wars of tomorrow and a whole lot of brass to back it up. As a United States Army Reserve (USAR)- funded Installation that enables Total Force readiness through mission related training, Devens Reserve Forces Training Area (RFTA) has recycled over 49.5 tons of spent brass over the past three fiscal years. Now, the USAR-funded Installation is actively working to set up a Qualified Recycling Program (QRP) to not only recycle brass shells, but eventually gain proceeds that can be fed back into the Installation to support critical sustainability and community programs.

Andrew Lombardo selected as 14th Command Sergeant Major of the Army Reserve
Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Lombardo is the 14th Command Sergeant Major, U.S. Army Reserve. Previously, Lombardo served as command sergeant major of the 200th Military Police Command, Fort Meade, Md. He is a combat veteran who has served in every leadership position from team leader to division command sergeant major.



During his 34 years of distinguished military service, he has served in six overseas deployments including Operation Desert Shield/Storm, Operation Joint Guard Bosnia, Operation Joint Guardian Kosovo, twice in service in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan).



Lombardo is a native New Yorker and in his civilian career, he serves as a police executive holding the rank of deputy inspector with the New York City Police Department.
June 29, 2020 - FORT BRAGG, N.C. – Lt. Gen. Charles D. Luckey, Chief of Army Reserve and Commanding General, U.S. Army Reserve Command, announces the selection of Command Sgt. Maj. Andrew Lombardo, as the 14th Command Sergeant Major, U.S. Army Reserve.

Army Reserve officer awarded for volunteer work
Maj. Chianti Ivory (third from left), a medical policy officer at the Office of the Chief of Army Reserve, poses for a photo before receiving an award at George Mason University, Feb. 18, 2020. Ivory was recognized with the “Made a Difference Award” for her selfless service and dedication to volunteering her time outside the military to helping veterans on hospice. (Courtesy photo)
June 26, 2020 - Maj. Chianti Ivory, a U.S. Army Reserve officer, living in Virginia, has been volunteering since she was a little girl. She says she started with her grandmother, who taught her to dedicate 10 percent of her time to serving others in need.

Huntsville Center REMs exceed energy savings goals for the Army Reserve
June 26, 2020 - The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville’s Resource Efficiency Manager Program not only continued to deliver the program, but exceeded energy savings goals for the 88th Readiness Division throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

No gym needed to improve fitness
U.S. Army Reserve Master Sgt. Susan Benavidez, an operations non-commissioned officer with the 211th Regional Support Group and Hood Mobilization Brigade, shows off her social distancing shirt during a workout session on March 25, 2020 at Fort Hood stadium. Soldiers with the Hood Mob Brigade practiced social distancing during their fitness sessions. 



U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Jasmine Edden
June 26, 2020 - Maintaining physical fitness is an individual requirement for every service member. Training the body to be prepared for the rigors of combat takes dedication, motivation, and a fitness training plan that pushes your body to be tougher, faster and develop greater endurance. Traditionally, having access to gyms and company organized physical training helped Soldiers meet these goals by providing weights, cardio equipment, and workout programs.

9th Mission Support Command responds to COVID-19 pandemic
Sgt. 1st Class Gilberto Rivera and Petty Officer 1st Class Robert Hannah pose for a photo in front of the runway upon completion of receiving Army Medical Lab equipment , May 7, at Marine Corps Base Hawaii in support of COVID19 response efforts and delivery of critical lab equipment from Hawaii to American Samoa, providing them additional testing capabilities.
June 25, 2020 - The 9th Mission Support Command, headquartered in Honolulu, Hawaii, has mobilized close to 400 personnel since March, throughout the Pacific, to provide assistance to Defense Support to Civil Authorities in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

It's really about a calling: Chaplain Colin Durham
U.S. Army Reserve CH (Maj.) Colin Durham, a chaplain with the 335th Signal Command (Theater), poses for a portrait at East Point, Georgia, May 28, 2020. Soldiers from the 335th Signal Command (Theater) headquarters took part in the U.S. Army's
June 25, 2020 - In 2009, Colin Durham's wife looked over at him and said, "I think you should go into the Army as a chaplain. The Army needs chaplains because you know, we're at war." He looked back at her and said, "Look, I'm way too old." The 44-year old was living in South Carolina with his two children and running a successful residential development company that he built from a construction business nearly 20 years before.

Army Reserve recruiting gif animation.

U.S. ARMY RESERVE COVID-19 RESPONSE

U.S. Army Reserve COVID-19 Response

U.S. ARMY RESERVE GUIDANCE
RELATED TO COVID-19  
(click images for pdf)

 »Soldier Virtual Battle Assembly Policy«

Luckey COVID-19 Update Memo

 »Virtual Battle Assembly« 
Virtual Battle Assembly
(text version)

 »Telework Guidance«
Telework Guidance
(text version)

Updated April 2, 2020

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